MATERNAL CONDITIONS

Maternal Conditions - High Risk Pregnancy Center of KCPregnancy can worsen existing health problems. We monitor these conditions and recommend medications that can manage mom’s medical problems to minimize risks to the mother and baby. Some health conditions that may complicate a woman’s pregnancy are described below.

Advanced Maternal Age

Women 35 years or older are more likely to have a child  born with a chromosomal problem such as Down syndrome. A  detailed or level 2  ultrasound looks for signs of birth defects  or markers that may suggest Down syndrome. A first-trimester screen is done between weeks 11 and 14 that includes a blood test and ultrasound.  Women  40 years or older are also at a higher risk for developing gestational diabetes or preeclampsia,  which can affect the baby’s growth and  development  during the pregnancy.
> MORE INFORMATION ON HAVING A BABY AFTER 35
> MORE INFORMATION ON GESTATIONAL DIABETES

 

Diabetes

Blood sugar that is not managed well in a pregnant woman with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes could lead to problems. Good  control of diabetes  prior to becoming pregnant lowers the risk of birth defects, while good control  during pregnancy  decreases  the chance  of developing preeclampsia, early  delivery, an  overly large baby, or the necessity for a C-section.
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HypertensionMaternal Conditions - High Risk Pregnancy Center of KC

High blood pressure can place extra stress on the mother’s heart and kidneys  and needs to be carefully monitored. Women with chronic high blood pressure risk preeclampsia, a  complication that can cause damage to  other organs, most often the liver and kidneys,  and even cause seizures or strokes.  Poor control of blood pressure can result in poor growth and development of the fetus. These complications can also lead to  preterm delivery of the  baby, which can result in more risks to the newborn infant.
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Autoimmune Diseases

Pregnancy affects different autoimmune disorders differently.  For example, pregnancy can  improve  the  mother’s disease in the case of rheumatoid arthritis while having no effect and/or worsening lupus.  Medications prescribed for autoimmune conditions may  need to  be given to prevent a flare-up of the disorder.  We review the risks of starting/resuming the medications against the risks of having an uncontrolled flare-up so that the woman and her autoimmune specialist can determine the best option for her pregnancy.
> MORE INFORMATION ON LUPUS

 

Anticoagulation

Blood clots form more easily during pregnancy, which most likely occurs to prevent heavy bleeding during childbirth. Treatment  varies if a woman has had a blood clot in the past, has an underlying blood clotting disorder such as Factor V Leiden, or she develops a blood clot during pregnancy and needs to start on anticoagulation.
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Obesity

Obesity is defined as having a body mass index of 30 or higher. Obesity during pregnancy places a woman at higher risk of developing gestational diabetes and preeclampsia, which can also affect the health and well-being of the baby. There is also a higher risk of birth defects including spina bifida.
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Thyroid Disorder

An underactive (hypothyroid) or overactive (hyperthyroid) thyroid can affect the health of the mother and the baby during pregnancy. Poor control of the thyroid can lead to a higher risk of miscarriage, preterm delivery, preeclampsia, fetal growth restriction, and poor brain development of the baby. Frequent monitoring of a woman’s thyroid levels is needed to make sure she is getting enough medication to keep her thyroid levels steady.
> MORE INFORMATION ON HYPOTHYROIDISM
> MORE INFORMATION ON HYPERTHYROIDISM

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